Basic Supplements_cover image

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products. 

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

  * Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Basic Supplements_cover image

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products. 

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

  * Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Basic Supplements_cover image

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products.

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

* Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Basic Supplements_cover image

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products.

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

* Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Basic Supplements_cover image

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products.

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

* Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products.

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

* Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products.

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

* Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Basic Supplements_cover image

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products. 

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

  * Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Basic Supplements_cover image

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products. 

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

  * Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Basic Supplements_cover image

Supplement Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.*

We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion.

Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon.

There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations.

To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products. 

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

  * Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

Basic Supplements_cover image

TOPIC: BASIC SUPPLEMENTS

In 2011, the Nutrition Business Journal reported US supplement sales at $23.7 billion. The current projection for 2017 tops $40 billion. Increased awareness, prevention, self-care, and an aging population reaching for longevity and wellness account for this growth and greater growth into the future.

 

Supplement

Your Health

  • Why Are Nutrient Supplements Important?
  • What Are The Basic Supplements?
  • Why Are They Called Micronutrients?
  • How Much Vitamin D3 Should You Take?

 

A Single Multivitamin-Mineral

Formula Is Not Enough!  Look Inside….

 

Supplement Your Health

     Amazingly, the Council for Responsible Nutrition Annual Survey shows that nearly 70% of Americans take nutritional supplements.* We remarked on the cover that monetary projections for supplement sales in 2017 top $40 billion. Although our focus is on Americans, the growing use of nutritional supplements is a global phenomenon. There are three important factors driving an increased interest in healthy living and the sales of natural products: 1) Increased consumer awareness for preventative healthcare; 2) The rise of self-directed consumers [We call you “savvy shoppers”.]; and 3) An aging population.

     Overall findings from the Economic Research Service of the USDA show that Americans do not meet Federal dietary recommendations. To meet these, the general populace would need to substantially lower their intake of added fats, refined grains, and added sugars and sweeteners, plus increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products. 

  * Nutrition News has published entire newsletters covering most of the supplements discussed throughout this newsletter. When a complete newsletter has been published, the supplement carries an asterisk.

               The Office of Dietary Supplements of the NIH has found that the use of supplements is associated with individuals who maintain a low body mass index (<25), engage in more physical activity, enjoy excellent or very good health, have never smoked or are former smokers, and drink wine. These people are playing the Nutrition News “Is It Healthy?” Game, and making supplement use a part of their positive lifestyles.

     At Nutrition News, we use supplements and have supported their use since our inception. Everybody needs at least a regular multivitamin-mineral formula (MVM). However, all MVM formulas, except the powders, are lacking in quantities of certain vitamins and minerals. Thus, we recommend additional amounts of the following: vitamins C, D, E, and K2; the minerals calcium,1 magnesium, and chromium; omega 3 fatty acids; and an adaptogen. People over 40, add coenzyme Q10 and possibly the hormone DHEA.

     These are the basic or matrix supplements. However, some supplements are used to target specific health conditions. The list of target supplements is as long as that of existing health complaints. Examples are acetyl-l-carnitine to enhance memory and glucosamine for arthritis or nonspecific pain.

     Matrix vitamins and minerals can also be used to target various conditions. One example is extra magnesium for PMS. However, another reason one might choose higher amounts of specific matrix supplements is biochemical individuality.

 

What Is Biochemical Individuality?

B

iochemical individuality is based on the principle that there is no such thing as an average person. We are all genetically and biochemically unique. This means that to be healthy, one body may demand vastly different quantities of a particular nutrient than another. This concept was established by the late world-renowned chemist, Roger J. Williams, PhD.2

     The recommended amounts of nutrients were established only to keep people from developing deficiency diseases. Getting the RDA of vitamin C will keep you from developing scurvy, but maybe not subscurvy. These official recommendations serve as starting points for determining one’s needs.

     Working with a nutrition-oriented health care professional can help you discover your individual nutrient needs. Other roads to discovery include DNA screening and blood tests to establish vitamin and mineral levels.

 

Learn Your ABCs

V

itamins, minerals, amino acids, fatty acids, coenzymes, and other bioactive supplements are known as micronutrients because they are used in minute amounts, at the most several gram weights. (One gram is about 1/4 teaspoon.)

    More than 40 percent of adults are lacking dietary intakes of vitamin A, C, D and E, calcium, and magnesium for their age and gender. Deficiencies of these nutrients lead to sickness and possible death.

     In this section, we discuss the nutrients commonly found in MVM formulas, leaving those we recommend in higher amounts for the next section.

VITAMINS

  • Vitamin A*, retinol, is well-known for its support of night vision. Fat soluble vitamin A also affects growth, healthy skin, (i.e., retin-A), immunity, and more. True vitamin A comes only from animal sources. Recommended at 5000-10,000 IU/d, it can be toxic when consistently taken in large amounts. (Studies show this is 50,000 IU/day for 18-24 months.3)
  • Beta carotene* comes from plants, is a precursor to vitamin A and has its own health effects. Because there are no toxicity issues, some MVM formulas contain only beta carotene. However, some of us do not convert beta carotene to vitamin A efficiently, making it important to get actual vitamin A.
  • Vitamin B Complex* supports our response to stress. These water soluble vitamins facilitate the work of every cell. They are deeply involved with metabolism and the release of energy from food. (Lack of energy is the most common symptom of inadequate intake.) They are also essential to the synthesis of DNA and RNA. They work best in balance so look for a formula that conforms to the pattern of the recommended amounts.

     Each B component has its own properties (which are not discussed here). MVM formulas carry more than adequate amounts of these nutrients. They are thiamin (B1, 1-1.5 mg), riboflavin (B2, 1.1-1.6 mg), niacin (B3, 14-18 mg4), pyridoxine hydrochloride and Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate (B6, itself a group of chemically-related compounds, upper limit is 100 mg with a recommendation of 1.3-2 mg), cyanocobalamin (B12, 2.4 mcg), biotin, pantothenic acid (sometimes called B5), and folic acid (400 mcg).5

    FYI: Folic acid deficiency in pregnant women is directly linked to the occurrence of neural tube defects (NTDs). NTDs involve incomplete development of the brain, spinal cord, and/or their protective coverings. The US Public Health Service recommends that all women of reproductive age take 400 mcg of folic acid daily.

MINERALS*

  • Iron (as citrate6) carries oxygen within the red blood cells. Inadequate amounts result in iron deficiency anemia. Recommendations depend on gender and age, varying from 10-30 mg/d.
  • Zinc (as citrate) is essential to several hundred enzyme systems. It helps with wound healing, immunity, and good prostate health. RDA 12-15 mg.
  • Copper is the zinc-balancing mineral. It also works along with iron, and a deficiency can lead to anemia. Nutritionist Ann Louise Gittleman points out that insufficient zinc causes copper overload and chronic tiredness. Inexplicable anxiety and PMS are also symptoms. Take a look at her book Why Am I Always So Tired? (In print and relevant, HarperCollins, 1999.)
  • Selenium is necessary to the body’s production of

glutathione peroxidase, a potent antioxidant. Low levels are linked to heightened risk for heart disease, cancer, inflammatory diseases, and other conditions involving free radical damage, such as cataracts. Amounts are 70 mcg for men and 55 for women. Upper daily limit is 200 mcg. Eating just one brazil nut per day will cover your selenium requirements.

  • Manganese (as citrate) is a key component of energy production. It is found in the mitochondria, the energy-producing powerhouse of the cell. One important role is its part in the production of SOD (superoxide dismutase), another of the body’s powerful antioxidants. The basic requirement is 2-5 mg.
  • Molybdenum is a recognized detoxifying agent for alcohol, sulfites, and nitrates. The adult requirement is 75-250 mcg.
  • Potassium is an important electrolyte.7 It helps maintain water balance and distribution; maintains acid-alkaline balance; muscle and nerve cell function; heart function; and kidney and adrenal functions. For health, potassium and sodium are balanced at a ratio of 5:1. Most Americans eat too much table salt, resulting in ratios of less than 1:2!

     Potassium recommendations range from 2-5.6 grams (2000 to 5600 mg). You cannot supplement potassium, which can only contain 99 mg per tablet. However, it is easily supplied through diet. A half avocado and a banana each contain 300 mg while half a yam has 600 mg. A serving of most meat and fish contains from 200-500 mg.

Extra Nutrition

V

itamin C*, the desert island supplement, affects every system in our body. Its primary biochemical function is the synthesis of collagen, the body’s most important structural substance. Collagen is a protein glue that supports and holds the tissues and organs together.

    Without vitamin C, scurvy sets in and the body literally disintegrates, many times beginning with loss of the teeth. Except for humans and three other mammals, all mammals produce their own vitamin C. That is where the controversy around dosing begins. We recommend 1000-3000 mg of vitamin C daily.

  • Vitamin D3*, see sidebar.
  • Vitamin E* is a potent antioxidant that can slow aging, protect your brain, prevent heart disease, lower cancer risk, and enhance immunity. In addition, studies suggest that this vitamin supports eye health, prevents or alleviates osteoarthritis, relieves leg cramps, encourages wound healing, deters AIDS, and improves the skin. A fat soluble vitamin found mainly in nut and seed oils, vitamin E is actually eight related compounds: four tocopherols and four tocotrienols. In his New Vitamin Bible, Earl Mindell, RPh, PhD, reports that the most common doses range from 200 to 1200 IU daily of plain vitamin E. Here, we use 200 IU of complete vitamin E.
  • Vitamin K2*, after over a decade, is beginning to get the attention it deserves. A different K from its cousin K1 (a phylloquinone), the blood coagulator, K2 (a group called menaquinones) is linked to both heart and bone health. In its presence, calcium goes to the bones rather than calcifying the arteries. This function keeps the bones strong and the arteries clean and flexible. New research indicates that K2 may be able to reverse already hardened arteries.

The best source of K2 is a fermented Japanese food called natto, which contains K2 as menaquinone-7. Natto is widely

available in supplement form at natural product stores. Dose at 45-90 mcg daily.

  • Chromium is important because insulin cannot function without it. Among insulin’s roles, we are interested in its ability to convert carbohydrate into energy. Without sufficient chromium both insulin and sugar (glucose) build up in the blood, leading to glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, heart disease, diabetes, and premature aging. Fifty to 200 mcg daily have been established as safe and adequate. Results have been obtained using up to 1000 mcg. Take higher amounts in divided doses. Supplemental chromium is available as GTF chromium (glucose tolerance factor), chromium polynicotinate, and chromium picolinate.
  • Calcium* (as citrate) must be present for new bone to form and old bone to repair. It also helps blood to clot, strengthens cell membranes, helps in nerve transmission, and is an electrolyte. In 2004, independent researchers (The Lewin Group) found that if the US population aged 65 and over took 1200 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D3 daily, in five years approximately 734,000 hip fractures would be avoided. This translates to a savings of $13.9 billion.
  • Magnesium* (as citrate) supplementation continues to play second fiddle to calcium even though it is just as important in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. It is almost totally unknown that magnesium influences a form of vitamin D which is imperative to calcium metabolism. It follows that a magnesium deficiency is associated with abnormal bone calcification and bone fragility.

     Magnesium is also important to every aspect of heart health. Other essential functions include energy production, the secretion and action of insulin, and helping with “female problems”. The late Mildred Seelig, PhD, quintessential magnesium researcher, recommended calculating magnesium needs by dividing our weight by 2.2 and multiplying the result by 6 mg. Hence, a 200 pound person would take 540 mg of magnesium.

  • Fish oil supplements* have gained in popularity, yet about 80 percent of Americans remain deficient in the essential omega-3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA. Improved heart health, better blood profiles, anti-inflammatory action, enhanced immunity, mood elevation, arthritis relief, promotion of brain and vision in infants and children are some of the strongest findings among the more than 20,000 articles on omega-3 oils. We recommend 3-6 grams of omega-3 capsules daily to deliver sufficient DHA and EPA.
  • Adaptogens* are plants that enhance the ability of both body and mind to adapt to stress. The vast majority of Americans are overworked, over-stressed, fatigued, and burned out. Adaptogens work by returning the body to balance from a state of stress. They act on the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, and endocrine system. The list of adaptogens includes classic ginseng (the foundation of initial research), Siberian eleuthero (“Siberian ginseng”), ashwaganda (“Indian ginseng”), Rodiola rosea (from Northern Europe), holy basil (also Indian), and maca (the Peruvian root).

 

Over 40?

T

wo important supplements for those over 40 are coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)* and the hormone DHEA. According to cardiologist Stephen T. Sinatra, CoQ10 not only improves the quality of life, it saves lives. CoQ10 can energize the body, strengthen the heart, revitalize the immune system, control periodontal disease, normalize blood pressure, overcome infertility, reverse the effects of aging, and more. This is because CoQ is necessary for the production of energy in every cell. Also, it protects the cells’ energy generators (the mitochondria) from free radical damage. CoQ10 supplementation is especially important to those still taking -statin drugs.

    The ability to synthesize CoQ declines with age. By our 30s, we may experience a decrease in energy and a general deterioration of our health. This is the time to start taking CoQ10 supplements. Athletes need supplements far earlier. Recommendations vary from 30 mg to 300 mg daily depending on the individual.

    DHEA is an anti-aging hormone with far-reaching effects. Like CoQ10, its production slows and then disappears with age. DHEA is readily converted into estrogen, testosterone, progesterone, and corticosterone. A large body of research has shown that adequate levels of DHEA may be useful in preventing and treating…heart disease, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, cancer, Alzheimer’s and other memory disturbances, immune disorders, and chronic fatigue. Although it is available in any health food store, we recommend that you have your DHEA values measured before taking it. That said, beginning doses for perimenopausal and menopausal women are 15 mg and for men (in midlife crisis), 50 mg.

 

 

Sidebar:

 

Let The Sunshine In!

     Here’s the big news! An intake of 2000 IU/day of Vitamin D3, and, when possible, moderate exposure to sunlight, could raise blood levels of vitamin D3 to those associated with a 50 percent reduction in the incidence of breast cancer.

    This conclusion came from pooled results of two studies involving over 3500 women. The article by Garland CF, et al, University of California San Diego, was published in the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

    Here are some further vitamin D revelations: Vitamin D is a hormone; every chronic degenerative disease is associated with a deficiency; in less than an hour in the sun, your body makes about 20,000 IU of

the vitamin. Unfortunately, a recent study shows that

up to 75 percent of Americans are not getting adequate amounts of either sunshine or supplemental vitamin D.

    In 2010, the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine (IOM) made new age-based recommendations, ranging from 400-800 IU/d. However, these increases are so modest that some experts find them drastically insufficient. Walter Willett of the Harvard School of Public Health, together with Heike Bischoff-Ferrari, published an online commentary (Huffington Post), stating that the IOM’s new recommendations are not even adequate for bone health. According to Bischoff-Ferrari’s recent meta-analyses, the necessary range is 792-2,000 IU.

    Meanwhile, Dr. John Cannell of the Vitamin D Council (the Guru of Vitamin D) states, “Personally, I take 5,000 units in the late fall, winter, and early spring, and then I vary doses the rest of the time depending on sun exposure. [Likewise, SDK.] My 10-year old daughter takes 2,000 units a day in the winter months, and my 3-year old takes 1,000 units a day in winter.”

 

 

 

Footnotes:

1  The daily requirement for calcium varies from 1000-1300 mg, depending on age and gender. If you want to supplement, first estimate about how much calcium you eat in a day. Calcium

    supplements need to be accompanied by vitamins D3 and K2 as well as magnesium in 1/2-1x the amount of calcium.

2  Roger J. Williams’ classic book Biochemical Individuality remains in print.

3  I have been taking 50,000-100,000 IUs of vitamin A every Monday for many years. This is in addition to the vitamin A in my MVM.

4  Is used therapeutically at very high levels (1000-3000 mg) to lower “bad” cholesterol and increase “good”.

5  For a much greater understanding of these vitamins, read Nutrition News “B Healthy” and “B Healthy 2”.

6  Citrate minerals are minerals that are combined with citric acid and as a result, are better absorbed. This is because they do not depend upon stomach acid for absorption. Use citrates

    when available. The Nutrition News mineral issues are truly fascinating.

7  The major electrolytes are sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, phosphate, and sulfate.