Baby Knows Best

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Baby knows best! Study shows baby-led weaning promotes healthy food preferences.

A study by psychologists at The University of Nottingham has shown that babies who are weaned using solid finger food are more likely to develop healthier food preferences and are less likely to become overweight as children than those who are spoon-fed pureed food.

The psychologists believe that understanding the factors that contribute to healthy nutrition in early childhood is crucial as this could be the best time to modify food preferences to encourage healthy diets. The findings show that baby-led weaning has a positive impact on the liking of carbohydrates – foods that form the building blocks of healthy nutrition. This is a significant result since, up to now, the factors thought to be most influential on early food preferences are sweetness and frequency of exposure.

http://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=116290&CultureCode=en

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Key House Panel Directs USDA to Consider Funding Multivitamins for Use in WIC Program

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Nutrition News Change What You Kids Eat and Change Their Future

Key House Panel Directs USDA to Consider Funding Multivitamins for Use in WIC Program

A key House Panel directed the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Nutrition Services (FNS) to prepare a report assessing the benefits of allowing vitamins to be purchased through the supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children (WIC).

“Women, infants and children utilizing the WIC program deserve equal access to and should be allowed to purchase vitamins,” said Dan Fabricant, CEO and executive director of NPA (Natural Products Association).  “The Committee’s instructions are a step in the right direction towards addressing the crisis of undernourishment in America.”

Vitamins are proven to have many health benefits especially relevant to those the WIC program intends to help:
· Classic nutrient deficiency diseases (scurvy, pellagra, and iron deficiency anemia);

· Improve appetite and growth rates in low-income children;

· Prevent neural tube birth defects;

· Protect against heart disease and stroke; and

· Build bone mass in the young.

“We will continue to look for policy options to improve access and availability to products that support a healthy lifestyle for American consumers,” Fabricant said.

NPA also sent a letter to the chairman and ranking member of the House Committee on Appropriations expressing its strong view that the WIC program should be expanded to include the purchase of multivitamins and multiminerals.

Read more www.npainfo.org.

 

Longer School Lunches Lead To Better Food Choices

School Salad Bar

Longer School Lunches Lead To Better Food Choices, Say Researchers

More research to inform industrial education. Less time to eat definitely makes an impact. Not only on food choices, but the amount of food chosen that gets eaten. More food waste.

I guess there’s a big difference between 20 and 15 minutes to eat lunch. What’s wrong with this picture? School salad bars are one of the easiest options available for teaching healthy food choices and learning life long values. If we don’t allow enough time to eat lunch, what’s the point?

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Toddlers Taking Vitamin D Have Less Body Fat

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The new study confirmed the importance for the development of strong bones of a vitamin D supplement of 400 IU/day during a baby’s first year.

Less Body Fat For Toddlers Taking Vitamin D

02/05/2016 14:52 GMT McGill University

A healthy intake of vitamin D in the first year of life appears to set children up to have more muscle mass and less body fat as toddlers, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatric Obesity.

The findings emerged from research initially aimed at confirming the importance of vitamin D for bone density. The additional benefit in terms of body composition came as a surprise for the research team.
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http://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/channels/news/less-body-fat-toddlers-taking-vitamin-d-260693

Further analysis also indicated a correlation between lean muscle mass and the average level of vitamin D in the body over the first three years of a child’s life.

The only other factor found to make a significant difference to the children’s amount of body fat was their level of physical activity.

Video Games May Help Increase Fruit, Vegetable Intake

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Serious Video Games May Help Increase Fruit, Vegetable Intake

04/05/2016 06:56 GMT Elsevier

Using a serious video game, Squires Quest! II: Saving the Kingdom of Fivealot, researchers from the United States Department of Agriculture / Agricultural Research Service Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital evaluated how creating implementation intentions (i.e., specific plans) within the goal-setting component in the game helped fourth and fifth grade students improve fruit and vegetable intake at specific meals.
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Full bibliographic information

“Meal-Specific Dietary Changes from Squires Quest! II: A Serious Video Game Intervention,” by Karen W. Cullen, DrPH, RD; Yan Liu, MS; Debbe I. Thompson, PhD (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2016.02.004), Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Volume 48, Issue 5 (May 2016), published by Elsevier.

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