Increase Your Bone Density With These Supplements

Steve just uploaded his latest podcast on how to build strong healthy bones for a lifetime. Thanks Steve.

“My wife increased her bone density by 7 % in 7 years.”

Steve LankfordI have worked with a lot of women regarding their bone health. It is one of the major concerns for women as they age. I know from personal experience as my wife went from osteopenia to osteoporosis by her mid 50s. This occurred even though she was on a quality bone support formula. She had the same result as thousands of other women who we desperate to stop the bone loss. Something was wrong.

The nutrients were all the reported required nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, vitamins D, B6 etc. These were the better of the formulas available in the early 2000s. My wife was looking for a solution that did not involve the drugs.

It was at this time that we learned something new about osteoporosis. We learned that strontium is used as a treatment for osteoporosis in some parts of the world. We learned of another nutrient called ipriflavone which has a similar benefit, and we were all learning about the importance of higher dose vitamin D3. So these were added to her supplement program. Her doctor was skeptical and wanted her to take a bisphosphonate bone building drug. No, thank you. As a result, her bone density was increased by nearly 4 percent in 4 years. Wow. She was then 60 years old and building bone.

Around 2010 we began to learn more about bone support nutrients.We discovered BioSil (orthosilisic acid) a specific Building Healthy Bones for Lifeform of collagen building silica. And we learned about vitamin K2. And so these were added to her program. The result after 2 more years was another 3 percent improvement in bone density. She is up 7 % in 7 years. She is soon due for her next bone density scan. Will this trend continue? It’s been an exciting result so far, and we anticipate continued benefit.

This is an expensive program to follow if you take everything my wife takes. So here is my list in declining order of importance. I have no basis for this other than personal experience of my wife and other women I have advised. You need to determine the program that you are comfortable with and can afford.

  • A high quality natural bone support formula – if you aren’t sure visit a knowledgeable health food store. Print Bone Health Article PDFThere are now bone building formulas that include higher amounts of vitamin D3 and added K2. Some even include strontium as a separate formula. These may be the more cost effective but somewhat limited way to go. Look for quality brands and then compare formulas and price.
  • Vitamin D3 – Get tested and the adjust to the optimum dose for you.
  • Vitamin K2 – 80 to 100 mcg. per day.
  • BioSil – follow label directions.
  • Strontium – 680 mg. per day, taken apart from calcium.
  • ipriflavone – follow label directions.

In this podcast, I will give you my best advice for women who are concerned about osteoporosis. You can also print out a copy of my paper entitled “A Natural Approach to Bone Health”. You will find in depth interview on vitamin D3, K2 and BioSil at HealthQuestPodcast.com. Search the TAG INDEX to easily find all related content.

From: steve@healthquestpodcast.com

PO Box 372
Suamico, WI 54173

Moderate Exercise Cuts Woman’s Stroke Risk

Hot Flash

Exercise is good. Did we need another study to tell us that? Maybe we should be talking about bio-identical hormone replacement therapy instead of how exercise helps mitigate synthetic hormone replacement drug therapy.

Moderate exercise like brisk walking may cut women’s stroke risk 20 percent.
Moderate exercise also helps offset some of the increased stroke risk in women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy.

Women don’t need to run marathons or do intense aerobics to reduce their stroke risk. Moderate-intensity exercise — such as brisk walking or playing tennis — may do the trick, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2014.

“I was surprised that moderate physical activity was most strongly associated with a reduced risk of stroke,” said Sophia Wang, Ph.D., the study’s lead author and professor in the department of population sciences within the Beckman Research Institute at the City of Hope in Duarte, Calif. “More strenuous activity such as running didn’t further reduce women’s stroke risk. Moderate activity, such as brisk walking appeared to be ideal in this scenario.”

The study found that moderate exercise also helps offset the increased stroke risk seen with postmenopausal women taking menopausal hormones, but not completely.

Researchers analyzed information from the 133,479 women in the California Teachers Study to see how many suffered a stroke between 1996 and 2010. Those who reported doing moderate physical activity in the three years before enrolling in the study were 20 percent less likely than women who reported no activity to suffer a stroke. “The benefits of reducing risk of stroke were further observed among the group of women who had a sustained moderate level of physical activity over time,” she said.

Postmenopausal women taking menopausal hormone therapy had more than a 30 percent higher risk of stroke than women who never used menopausal hormone therapy. After the women stopped taking hormones, their risk began to diminish. (They still rerain from distinguishing bio-identical hormones from the synthetic hormones shown to cause problems – unlike bio-identical hormones).

Menopausal woman exercising with dumbel“The effects of physical activity and hormone therapy appear immediate and the benefits of physical activity are consistent in premenopausal and postmenopausal women,” Wang said. Therefore, Wang recommends that women incorporate some type of physical activity into their daily routine. “You don’t have to do an extreme boot camp. The types of activities we’re talking about are accessible to most of the population.” Power walking and recreational tennis, for example, do not necessarily require special memberships to gyms.

The study also found that women with diabetes had elevated stroke risk, although this group encompassed women who also were overweight. “Physical activity, obesity and diabetes are all highly correlated with one another,” Wang said. “Stroke prevention among diabetics is thus a particularly important scientific question to address.”

Although 87 percent of the women were white, Wang said she believes the study’s results may also apply to women in other racial/ethnic groups because the amount of stroke risk reduction was so robust. Further studies are needed to determine how much moderate exercise helps those with diabetes avoid strokes.

Co-authors are: Leslie Bernstein, M.S., Ph.D.; James Lacey, Jr., M.P.H., Ph.D.; Kamakshi Lakshminarayan, M.D., Ph.D. Mitchell Elkind, M.D., M.S., M.Phil; Daniel Woo, M.D.; Ph.D.; Jenna Voutsinas, M.P.H.; and Chengyi Zhong, M.P.H.

Author disclosures are on the abstract.

The study was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The California Teachers Study group is funded by the National Cancer Institute.

http://newsroom.heart.org/news/moderate-exercise-cuts-womens-stroke-risk-helps-offset-increase-risk-from-hormone-therapy?preview=741b7b48c4303ef9d96a6c3f7617aa86

Heart Disease Linked With Dementia In Older Postmenopausal Women

14 December 2013 American Heart Association

heart disease in womenHeart disease may put older postmenopausal women at higher risk for decreased brain function such as dementia, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Our study provides further new evidence that this relationship (between heart disease and dementia) does exist, especially among postmenopausal women,” said study author Bernhard Haring, M.D., M.P.H., clinical fellow in the Comprehensive Heart Failure Center and the Department of Internal Medicine I at the University of Würzburg in Germany. “And many different types of heart disease or vascular disease are associated with declining brain function.”

Researchers, conducting neurocognitive exams on nearly 6,500 U.S. women ages 65-79 who had healthy brain function at the start of the study, found:

  • Postmenopausal women with heart disease or vascular disease were 29 percent more likely to experience cognitive decline over time compared with women without heart disease.
  • The risk for cognitive decline was approximately double among women who had a heart attack compared with those who had not had a heart attack.
  • Women who had heart bypass surgery, carotid endarterectomy (surgical removal of a blockage in a neck artery) or peripheral artery disease were at greater risk for cognitive decline.
  • Risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes increased risk for cognitive decline over time.
  • Obesity didn’t notably increase cognitive decline in elderly women.

“Women with heart disease — in particular women who have had a heart attack, bypass surgery, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, peripheral vascular disease or carotid endarterectomy — should be monitored by their doctors for potential cognitive decline,” Haring said. “It is also very important to adequately manage heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes.”

Dementia is an increasingly significant problem in developed countries, so researchers said more study is warranted on how preventing cardiovascular disease may preserve cognitive health.

Co-authors are Xiaoyan Leng, M.D., Ph.D.; Jennifer Robinson, M.D.; Karen C. Johnson, M.D., M.P.H.; Rebecca D. Jackson, M.D.; Rebecca Beyth, M.D., M.Sc.; Jean Wactawski-Wende, Ph.D.; Moritz Wyler von Ballmoos, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.; Joseph S. Goveas, M.D.; Lewis H. Kuller, M.D., Dr.PH.; and Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Institutes of Health funded the study.

For the latest heart and stroke news, follow us on Twitter: @HeartNews.

http://newsroom.heart.org/news/heart-disease-linked-with-dementia-in-older-postmenopausal-women?preview=93b5657b5708471ca29aab973a9182d3

Full bibliographic informationHeart disease linked with dementia in older postmenopausal women
Bernhard Haring, M.D., M.P.H.
Cardiovascular Disease and Cognitive Decline in Postmenopausal
Women: Results From the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study
J Am Heart Assoc. 2013;2:e000369 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.113.000369

Modest Weight Loss May Reduce Heart Disease, Diabetes Risks In Middle-aged Women

14 December 2013 American Heart Association

Moderate Weight Loss for WomenModest weight loss over 2 years in overweight or obese, middle-aged women may reduce risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

In a study of 417 women participating in weight loss programs for up to 24 months, those who sustained a 10 percent or more loss of their body weight for two years reduced their total cholesterol, LDL “bad” cholesterol, HDL “good” cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, glucose and inflammation markers. Women who had the highest levels of risk at the start of the study benefited the most from modest weight loss.

“It is challenging to lose weight, but if women commit to losing 10 percent of their body weight and sustain that over time, it can have a large impact on overall risk factors associated with heart disease and diabetes,” said Cynthia A. Thomson, Ph.D., R.D., co-author and Professor in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health and Director of the University of Arizona Canyon Ranch Center for Prevention & Health Promotion in Tucson.

The women, an average 44 years old and weighing nearly 200 pounds at the start of the study, were recruited within the communities of the University of California, San Diego; University of Minnesota; University of Arizona; and Kaiser Permanente Center Northwest in Portland, Ore.

Factors that may affect creeping weight gain in middle-aged women include sedentary jobs, repeated pregnancy and the transition to menopause. In the end, a large percent of middle-aged American women find themselves weighing much more in their forties than they weighed in their teens, Thomson said

Women in short-term weight loss programs usually do better with weight loss in the first six months and then they start to rebound, researchers said.

“Our study revealed the need for healthcare providers to provide women with longer-term support for weight control. It seems to pay off in terms of modifying risk factors for obesity-related disease,” Thomson said.

“The good news is that when you lose weight long-term, you just don’t move to a smaller dress size, you are actually moving these risk factors markedly and likely reducing your risk of heart disease and diabetes,” Thomson said.

Jenny Craig, Inc. funded the study.

Co-authors are: Caitlin A. Dow, Ph.D.; Shirley W. Flatt, M.S.; Nancy E. Sherwood, Ph.D.; Bilge Pakiz, Ed.D.; and Cheryl L. Rock, Ph.D., R.D. Disclosures are on the manuscript.

For the latest heart and stroke news, follow us on Twitter: @HeartNews.

Learn how to Master the Scale! and manage your weight.

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association’s policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

http://newsroom.heart.org/news/modest-weight-loss-may-reduce-heart-disease-diabetes-risks-in-middle-aged-women?preview=fc4d9814e02a35a6c63eb7ee82e7a9e9

Full bibliographic information Modest weight loss may reduce heart disease, diabetes risks in middle-aged women
Cynthia A. Thomson, Ph.D., R.D.,
Predictors of Improvement in Cardiometabolic Risk Factors
With Weight Loss in Women
Assoc. 2013;2:e000152 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.113.000152)

How To Find Safe Cosmetics In A Toxic World

How many products did you put on your body today? Shampoos, deodorants, lotions, and soaps promise to make us feel shiny, fresh, soft and clean. But how clean are these products, really?

Here are 10 Big Ideas  you should know before you put on a cosmetic product by Stacy Malkan. Stacy  is co-founder of the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics and author of the award-winning book Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of the Beauty IndustryShe is a leading advocate for safer products, healthy food and clean production.

Top 10 Big Ideas  Healthy Skin: Put Your Best Face Forward

 

Now that we have some perspective and a little  context, another resource is Don’t Go to the Cosmetics Counter Without Me: A unique guide to skin care and makeup products from today’s hottest brands. by Paula Begoun. Paula names names and rates brands in this encyclopedic tome. If you’ve ever bought a brand of cosmetic and wondered just how it stacks up in the world of branded products, this is for you.

It’s still a buyer beware world to navigate. Part of playing the “Is It Healthy?” Game is to be more informed. The more we are,  the savvier and happier a buyer we’ll be. That’s especially true when cosmetics talks turn ugly.

skewed image of woman fashion modelIf you’ve ever considered that maybe not all that’s glamorous is good for us, then see what happens when the imagine clothes for models.

Perhaps there’s something else going on when it comes to how the media treated women this year.

Here’s five minutes of what the media actually does to women. Pervasive media, impossible standards and photoshop are all that’s needed. It’s not wonder cosmetics is such big business.


				
					
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